Our New Travel Mate. He’s Such a Trip!

Our New Travel Mate. He’s Such a Trip!

A year ago this past April, we had to have our sweet, hammock-loving Chihuahua Cordie put to sleep.  She had had a very bad stroke and she wasn’t dealing with life well.  It broke our hearts and traveling just wasnt’ quite the same.  

Our sweet girl was definitely a traveler and she has been missed greatly.

Cordie was an extremely good travler and she was always ready to “go”.  There are so many times she would stalk the car and try to jump in.  When we did get her into the car, she would get right into car seat and begin to demand us to drive forward. It was this spirit we hoped we would have when it was time to adopt a new member of the travel team, if we ever did.

Such a tiny boy at 8-weeks-old!

After taking time to allow our hearts to heal, we adopted Trip on February 24 this year when he was 8-weeks-old. The drive to get him was a little over two hour and it felt like it took forever, but we soon arrived and were greeted by who was his father. The father was half Sish Tzu and half Pomeranian which is a breed called Shiranian. They are usually anywhere between 4 and 15 pounds in weight, 7 to 12 inches in size, and extremely fluffy!

Artwork: Shih Tzu Image by ana_olly and Pomeranian Image by life_is_beautiful from Pixabay.

These Shiranian dogs are extremely smart so easy to train, friendly, and are small. That was just want I wanted; a pocket puppy that I could take with me EVERYWHERE! However, every place we looked the price was $500 USD and higher! I was getting extremely frustrated so I began to look at the local dog shelters. Unfortunately, the small dogs were adopted before we could see them and the large dogs would not work in our tiny RV. Scott was telling me not to get upset because the right dog would come along, but I was definitely getting frustrated.

Sound asleep as we drive home trying to come up with the perfect name.

We discussed his name and came up with so many, but nothing really seemed to work. Then, halfway home, Scott said something about how he couldn’t wait to see how he dealt with a “real road trip.” It dawned on both of us, we would always be “taking a trip” and that was how we knew his name was TRIP. No matter where we went we would be “taking a TRIP.”

Scott and I usually stop in for a good dose of coffee before we head out to collect counties; Trip gets to enjoy pup-cups!

Trip is a very good traveler. He is just a puppy still, but we hope he will be as much fun as Cordie was. That girl was always ready to go and often times was seen circling the car when she saw us putting luggage in the car. So far he hasn’t figured out the difference is us going somewhere and us traveling, but he is smart enough, I think he will figure it out soon.

Trip visited his very first State Park in Missouri on March 20, 2022.
Many sticks were carried on the trail.

We were able to take him to his very first State Park and collect his first five counties in March. He was very excited about it. Since he loves to collect sticks, he had a very difficult time choosing one. He would pick one up on the trail and within minutes find another one he would rather have. Unfortunately, we had to explain to him that we do not take things from the parks. He was not amused.

Above is a short video of Trip his first three months with us. He has brought us so much happiness and we do hope we are making him happy as well.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read our blog posts. We appreciate it so very, very much!

We Have a STATEment To Make

We Have a STATEment To Make

One of the things we love to collect are counties of the United States. Because counties are within the states, we are able to count off those states as well. It is very much a win-win for us. So far at this point we have visited 44% of the states (22 out of 50). The states we have visited are Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisanna, Mississippi, Missouri, Montona, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. Unfortunately, we did not always think of getting us and the state sign. I’m not sure why, but we just did not.  I guess this means we will need to head back to those states and get the state signs.

Most of the photos of the state signs we have visited.

Runaway June stands in front of an Arkansas state sign to document her travels.

Like Runaway June, we love the memories we have concerning our travels.  These photos not only serve as memories of our travels, but they help us to show our friends and family where we are and where we have been.  We do this by putting the photos on this website.  Because the photos on the site, we are able to log on and verify where we have visited and make our travel plans for an upcoming trip, as well as traveling on the spur of the moment.

One of the main reasons we are keeping photos of us with state, state park, and national park signsis because we live in an RV.  When you live in such a small space, you do not have room for the various knick knacks from a state tourism office here, state park there, or a national park everywhere else.  So we decided we could make postcards to send our GrandGeorges and friends, and the website.  It has reminded us what a wonderful life we have had and dream about all the new places we will go.

Everyone has a way and reason they travel.  For us it is pulling over to the side of the road and dashing over to the state sign  and take a photo so we can share our adventures.  It isn’t for everyone, just as collecting counties isn’t for all.  Do you have any travel traditions your family does as you move along the the roads, train tacks, and skies?

Thank you so much for taking the time to join us for this adventure.  If you would like to enjoy more of our travels, please feel free to visit our YouTube channel and see what we are doing.

Waco Mammoth National Monument 2016

Waco Mammoth National Monument 2016

Scott and I visited the Waco Mammoth National Monument in 2016. We absolutely loved visiting this site because of the fossils. Those of you who have been following us for a while know how excited I tend to get when I find fossils. There is something about seeing where places were during pre-history. It has helped me be able to see how real science really is.

We decided to do a video about our trip. If you haven’t already watched it, please feel free to take a few moments and see what a great national monument site this is. Also, go ahead and like the video and subscribe if you haven’t already. Liking the video will help YouTube show others, where we are, and subscribing, will enable you to see when we have a new video posted.

If you want to see a real fossil dig site, this is the place you want to visit. For further information about Waco Mammoth National Monument, please visit https://www.nps.gov/waco/index.htm

Thank you so much for watching our video. We do hope you have enjoyed it.

A very special thank you go out to Raegan King, Director of the Waco Mammoth National Monument; Gena Stuchbery, our amazing guide; Dava Butler, Education Coordinator; and the full staff and volunteers of Waco Mammoth National Monument.

Thank you also goes out to President Obama for making this a National Monument. We appreciate it very, very much.

To see President Obama’s signing the law designating three new national monuments in which the Waco mammoth site was one, go here: https://youtu.be/WIzOG-Rz8PY

Triumphant Return by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/

We Drive

We Drive

Scott and I drive a lot when we do our travels. There are 3,144 counties in the United States and we intend to pass through each of them; driving tends to be the way we are best able to do this. It enables us to stop and visit a town, getting to experience the people, their foods, and their culture. This is a bit slower than flight, but we both feel the hours getting to a destination is well worth it when we see the colored in space on the maps.

When we decide to go on what we call “Collecting Grab” trips, we sit down with Google maps or even a paper road map to plan the best route there and back going through as many different counties as possible. This often means never taking the same road twice. It is extremely rare for us to take the major highways or toll roads unless we need to get through previously collected counties.

If we are on trips that are more than a day trip, we will fill our vehicle up with delicious food, changes of clothing, and hammock/sleeping gear. While Scott is at work, I am able to get everything together and packed away; this enables me to pick him up as soon as his workday is finished and we can be on the road towards our destination.

Since we started doing these three to four-day trips to cover as much ground as possible we find National Forests and State Parks that are along our route to rest when we can no longer drive. We will pull into a camping area and set up our hammocks and cover. This is a quick setup and easy takedown so we are able to pull off the road as late as we need and leave as soon as we can minutes after we have woken up.

One of the things we find ourselves saying when we travel is that it is never a true adventure until we have left the pavement. Surprisingly, this happens to us a lot. We have been driving along a perfectly good paved road when “BLAM!” we have crossed onto a gravel road. These roads, however, have been some of the most beautiful places and there is almost always a surprise waiting for us.

Yes, we drive a lot. This means gas is our largest expense when we are on the road. Because of the style of travel we do and not need to use a hotel room, we are able to afford it. There have been times we needed to stay at a roadside hotel or motel, but we will stay in the most inexpensive place we can. We have been able to find some really awesome deals at Priceline Express Deals (https://www.priceline.com/elmo/pl/hotel/express-deals/list). However, a room with a view is a very rare occurrence for us.

Scott and I enjoy driving along the county roads within our country. This has enabled us to see what each state has to offer its people and how the people live and celebrate their lives. We love the miles we put behind us on the roads we drive upon no matter if they are paved, gravel, or dirt. We enjoy the adventure of having our expectations changed because the trip shows us so much more about a place. Yes, we drive, a lot; but, it is what we love to do.

Do you want to know more about our adventures of collecting counties? If so, visit our website blog post “We’re Finished With Arkansas” (http://www.stitchntravel.com/traveling-thursday-july-19-2018/).

Remember to get out and live life outside your box!!!
All images taken by Scott and Ren. ©2021crosscountytravelers

It Once Was A National Park, But No More

It Once Was A National Park, But No More

When the Chickasaw Nation was forced to relocate to Indian Territory, within their new borders they found a wooded area filled with fresh water and strong-smelling mineral water springs. They believed these springs had healing powers. Fearing that they would not be able to protect this area from commercial development and becoming another Hot Springs, Arkansas, they sold it to the Federal Government, with the condition that it be protected, and kept open to the public. In 1902 Senator Orville Platt introduced legislation designating this area the Sulphur Springs Reservation, and in 1906 Congress passed legislation creating Platt National Park, named for Senator Platt, who had recently died.

CCC built structure around Buffalo Springs.

At 640 acres, Platt National Park was the seventh and the smallest unit in the National Park System. Though small it was no less popular, in 1914 it received more visitors than Yellowstone or Yosemite. In the 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corps was assigned to make improvements, to make the area deserving of being a National Park. They added many buildings, and landscape features, that significantly altered the character of the park. By 1949 it was receiving more than a million visitors a year. However, many people within Congress felt that Platt National Park lacked the grandeur and scope expected of a National Park. On March 17, 1976, Congress changed the status from Platt National Park to the Chickasaw National Recreation Area because it was not the same natural beauty as Yellowstone and Yosemite. This former national park was added to the Arbuckle Recreation Area to create a lush playground for all to enjoy.

Lake of the Arbuckle’s on a foggy fall morning.

The older portion of the park, the Platt District, remains popular, still receiving more than a million visitors a year. It features the springs, a swimming hole, fishing, boating, hiking, and camping. The swimming hole has a small man-made waterfall called the Little Niagara. Here the spring water is cold and a host to people of all cultures.

The lower falls at Little Niagara.

There are three basic camping areas. The Lake of the Arbuckles areas: Buckhorn, Guy Sandy, and The Point. One, Guy Sandy, is first-come-first-serve and does not require a reservation. You simply show up, decide on your spot and visit the kiosk, then pay for your stay. Buckhorn and The Point are reservation camping loop is very nice with full hook-ups and full almost all year round. The third camping area is within the historic Platt District, the original area of the park has three camping loops, in which the only one is open year-round and only first-come-first-serve. This area is surrounded by the rushing creek and active in the springtime.

Ren and I first visited in the Fall of 2013, we were on the way back from visiting family in Oklahoma. This was before we really caught the travel bug, but we fell in love with the park and made plans to return. We have revisited the park several times since then, it is a reasonable drive from both Fort Worth and from Tulsa. When I started photography it was one of the first places I wanted to go.

We decided one day to visit the visitor center and hike trails behind it. Here the shade from the canopy of trees kept us cool in the Oklahoma August heat. It was quiet for the most part, except the various little waterfalls and birds chattering in the treetops. Here we found a peaceful place just minutes away from the main county road. It was an amazing hike.

Hiking along on one of the many trails at Chickasaw National Recreation Area.

We then took the time to swim in the swimming hole just below Little Niagara Falls. We even followed many of the young people and jumped off the top! It was exhilarating. I remember my heart pumping and watching the people ahead of us pop up from down below. My knee was aching, it was only recently healed from being broken and the cold, spring water felt good, taking away the swelling.

It may not be a National Park anymore, but it is still worth a visit if you are in the area.

Thank you so much for joining us on this park adventure. We appreciate you stopping by and taking the time to enjoy the time with us. Please remember to help us get out to many others and share this post.

Remember to get out and live life outside your box!!!
All images taken by Scott and Ren. ©2021crosscountytravelers

Staying Flexible

Staying Flexible

It was time to head back to our camp in Black Mesa and Google wanted to take us back to Clayton, but we hate taking the same road back as the road we came on, so we, trying to be flexible, took the road less traveled; literally. What a difference. We went north through Folsom then took a small road east. It alternated between paved and gravel, and, usually, the gravel was smoother, but it was so worth it. The road led through a canyon we didn’t find on the maps, and where there is a canyon, there is a stream. The canyon, river, and road were all named the Dry Cimarron. Yes, another branch of the Cimarron River. The canyon went on for hours, almost entirely empty. Huge, rugged, and beautiful in a very different way than the other Cimarron Canyon, but no less impressive. It was one of my favorite parts of the trip.

Scott taking photos at Petite Jean Mountain, Arkansas.

If you want to do astrophotography, one of the things you have to deal with is light pollution. You have to get where it is dark, far away from the city lights. Living in Fort Worth, was not terribly difficult. I was about an hour and a half from reasonably dark skies, and three hours from very dark skies. The other thing you have to deal with is that you need to shoot when the moon is not in the sky, so the New Moon is ideal. Once we moved back to Tulsa, really dark skies were further away. Looking at the Light Pollution map on http://darksitefinder.com I saw that the darkest skies in Oklahoma were found at the far western end of the panhandle. In fact, these were as dark as any place in the continental U.S., and right there in the middle of these wonderfully dark skies was Black Mesa State Park. I wanted to go. The problem was that it was over seven and a half hours away; this would be a major trip. I had suggested it a few times, but Ren had not been enthusiastic because she was worried about the heat and the distance.

When I saw the August New Moon was going to fall on a weekend, and that it was going to fall during the middle of the Perseid Meteor Shower, I told Ren that I was going to want to be somewhere DARK that weekend. I was surprised when she suggested that we go to Black Mesa. It took me about half a second to agree. We started our planning. More accurately, Ren started planning. She presented me with three plans with a breakdown of costs, driving times, and the number of new counties we could get.

Night sky at Fort Griffin State Historic Site in Texas.

We figured out what we wanted to see while we were there, which counties we would visit, how much gas it was going to take, and even where we would buy our gas, as we were headed into areas where you could not count on gas stations being nearby when you ran low. We knew we were headed to the park. There were three tri-state markers we wanted to visit, (A tri-state marker is where three states meet. If it’s not in the middle of a river, there will usually be a marker of some kind.), and, since Ren loves geology as much as I love astronomy, we were going to visit the Capulin Volcano National Monument in New Mexico.

Taking a half-day Thursday off from work we hit the road as soon as I got off work. We drove straight to the park along Highway 412, with only a minor detour to visit Gloss Mountain State Park, which was right on the way. We arrived at camp just after dark and got our first surprise. For a park that brags about their dark skies, they had the place lit up like downtown. Street lights everywhere. We would have to get away from the park to get our stars. We set up our hammock stand camp for the first time in the dark, but they are very straightforward and it went quickly. It was cloudy that evening, with a small chance of rain Thursday and Friday, but we got lucky, while there were storms around us, they passed us by.

We spent Friday, as planned, exploring the park, visiting two of the three tri-state markers, and a couple of canyons in Colorado. Friday evening I found a location and set up to take pictures, but it was pretty cloudy and I didn’t get the dark skies I had anticipated.

Saturday the plan was to get the third tri-state marker and visit the Capulin Volcano National Monument in New Mexico. We left camp and headed toward the Oklahoma-Texas-New Mexico border. When we got close enough to civilization to get a cell phone signal, I checked the weather forecast. The clear skies that had been predicted, were looking more and more unlikely. I wasn’t going to get my stars, again. I wasn’t too upset about it because we were having a great trip, and if you do astronomy long, you know that this is just part of the hobby. Sometimes it works out and sometimes it doesn’t.

Us at the Oklahoma-New Mexico-Colorado tri-state marker.

As we headed into Clayton New Mexico, on the way to the Volcano, I looked at the map and told Ren, “If I can’t have stars, I want mountains. Let’s go to Taos.” She asked how far it was, and I told her it was just over two hours. I expected a little resistance to scrapping the plan she had worked so hard on, however, to my surprise, she agreed right away. At this point, we knew nothing about Taos except that there were mountains. While Ren drove, I tried to figure out what we wanted to do when we got there. We aimed to stop at a place called Eagles Nest Lake State Park, and figure out where to go from there. While I looked over Google Maps, I saw a marker for Cimarron Canyon State Park, but it wasn’t clear what it was. We drove on toward the mountains, which were becoming more and more impressive the closer we got to them.

Reaching the town of Cimarron, we stopped at a tourist information booth to pick up some brochures and spoke with the attendant. I noticed a National Park Passport stamp and asked her what it was for. It turns out that Cimarron Canyon was a National Scenic, and Historic drive and we were driving right through it to get to Eagles Nest. We always try to take any Scenic Byway we pass. This was as beautiful as any with its huge cliffs and thick forest while the Cimarron River flowed the length of the canyon. I love Rivers, and the Cimarron is not just any river, it flows into Keystone lake just a few miles from where we live in Oklahoma where I have camped many times. It had an entirely different character here near its beginning. The middle section of the canyon was the state park, with lots of campsites along the road. We were in love with the place.

The Cimarron River near the headwaters.

Reaching the town of Eagles Nest we had decided that we could see lots of interesting places by taking the Enchanted Circle Scenic Loop, which includes Taos and goes through large areas of the Carson National Forest. The only issue was that it was nearly 3:00 pm and we were about three hours from camp if we skipped the volcano. I wasn’t willing to skip the volcano because I knew how much it meant to Ren.

I called my boss, asking if I could take an extra day of vacation, while Ren tried to find a reasonably priced hotel; turns out that reasonably priced and Taos, don’t really go together. After a bit of searching, we found a room right in Eagles Nest so we booked the room. While we chatted with the manager, he told us that if we were driving the Loop, we should be sure and drive over to the Gorge Bridge, and told us how to get there. We were set with a basic plan for the afternoon so we headed out on the Enchanted Circle Scenic Loop and it was well worth taking the extra day. There is something about the mountains that call to me, something that feels like home. Whether it’s the Davis Mountains in Texas, the Ozarks in Arkansas, or the Sierra Nevadas in California. I love the mountains. These were no exception. It was a gorgeous drive through mountains, forests, and quaint little towns. The highest pass we drove through was just over 9,800 feet.

There were several roadside parks that were part of the Carson National Forest when we stopped at one to stretch our legs a bit, we crossed a small stream flowing gently over the rocks. To my surprise, it was the Red River. We had lived on the Red River for five months when we were park hosting on Lake Texoma for Eisenhower State Park. We had even made a point of crossing every Red River bridge from Texas to Oklahoma, and here we were crossing it again in New Mexico; it was so small.

The Red River between Oklahoma and Texas

As we made our way around the loop we reached the intersection where we turned left to go to Taos, or right to go to the gorge bridge. We turned right. Wow! Just Wow!. On this trip, we had seen mesas, huge mountains, beautiful lakes, canyons, cliffs, forests, and scenic rivers, but this was by far the most majestic and impressive thing that we saw. It was the Río Grande del Norte National Monument. The Rio Grande. We have traveled extensively in Texas, spent the better part of three years trying to see as much of Texas as possible, yet this was our first time to see the Rio Grande. It was amazing. This is the seventh highest bridge in the US, 565 feet above the river. There is a parking area on either side, with a scenic overlook, and you can walk out on the bridge. It was truly awesome, in the best sense of the overused word.

Reluctantly, we left the gorge and headed into Taos. I won’t spend much time on Taos, as this is getting rather long enough already. We drove around for a few hours, loved the place. Ren wants to move there; of course, she says that about every place we visit. I guess it’s a good thing we plan to buy an RV someday so we can live wherever we visit.

Río Grande del Norte National Monument

I suggested that we visit the Taos Ski Valley before heading back to the hotel. This was the first place I got any real pushback from her. Not that she didn’t want to go, but she is frightened about driving down twisty, turny roads, especially since it was getting late in the day; however, me driving scares her even more because, in her words, she is a bad passenger. One of the things I admire most about Ren is that she does not let her fears get the better of her. It took her a few moments to work up her nerve, but she agreed.

The Hondo Canyon Road is the road that leads up the valley to the ski lodge. I know I’ve said this several times already, but it was a beautiful drive through the valley with huge cliffs, tall trees, and a valley, there was, naturally, a stream named the Hondo, Rio. As is usual in this area, we were in the Carson National Forest and there were lots of scenic roadside campgrounds. We drove up to the lodge, but it was getting late, so we didn’t get out of the car, then headed through the valley again, stopping at a few of the parks.

It was time to be heading back to the hotel. The last leg of the drive was the twistiest and turniest road of the entire trip, and it was full dark, so we didn’t see most of it. When we got back to the hotel, Ren went to bed; she was exhausted from the last leg of the drive. The hotel manager told me earlier I could get a good view of the milky way from the deck on top of the hotel overlooking the lake. I went to take some pictures, but between the hotel and city lights, they were not the skies I had come seeking, but they weren’t bad.

Milky Way above Eagles Nest, New Mexico.

The next morning we found the entire town socked in with fog. We were not eager to drive through the canyon again until the fog lifted, so we walked through town to find breakfast. What we found instead was there wasn’t anywhere in Eagles Nest to get breakfast at 8:00 on a Sunday Morning. Did I mention that Eagles Nest is tiny? Did I mention that Eagles Nest is at an altitude of more than 8,200 feet? We hadn’t really paid much attention to that before taking our walk, but as we were walking back the thinness of the air became apparent. We were huffing and puffing by the time we got back.

When the fog burned off we headed back through the valley to Cimarron then north to Raton, where we found breakfast. Then we took the Raton pass into Colorado where we visited Trinidad State Park, before heading to the Capulin Volcano National Monument. This is an extinct, cinder cone volcano, with the cone remarkably preserved. There are a visitors center and a road that wraps around the cone to a parking lot near the top. From there you can hike down into the vent, or around the rim. We intended to hike around the rim, but between the altitude, our exhaustion, and general lack of fitness we turned back well before we reached the top. It was still worth the trip, and even from the parking area near the top, it is an impressive view.

Scenic view from on top of Capulin Volcano National Monument.

It was time to head back to our camp in Black Mesa and Google wanted to take us back to Clayton, but we hate taking the same road back as the road we came on, so we took the road less traveled; literally. What a difference. We went north through Folsom then took a small road east. It alternated between paved and gravel, and, usually, the gravel was smoother, but it was so worth it. The road led through a canyon we didn’t find on the maps, and where there is a canyon, there is a stream. The canyon, river, and road were all named the Dry Cimarron. Yes, another branch of the Cimarron River. The canyon went on for hours, almost entirely empty. Huge, rugged, and beautiful in a very different way than the other Cimarron Canyon, but no less impressive. It was one of my favorite parts of the trip.

Dry Cimarron River Canyon in Northeastern New Mexico.

We got back to camp at a reasonable time, and as we were settling in, it became apparent we were going to have clouds again that night. Realizing I was not going to get the perfect night sky photo, I suggested we pack up camp and head south into Texas. In visiting the Texas Panhandle a few weeks earlier, we now had visited all but two counties in Oklahoma. The last two were down south and we decided to go get them.

We got back to camp at a reasonable time, and as we were settling in, it became apparent we were going to have clouds again that night. Realizing I was not going to get the perfect night sky photo, I suggested we pack up camp and head south into Texas. In visiting the Texas Panhandle a few weeks earlier, we now had visited all but two counties in Oklahoma. The last two were down south and we decided to go get them. In no time we were on the road. An hour and a half drive, and a minor crisis involving so many bugs hitting the windshield we could barely see out took us to Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. Being Sunday night the place was empty and we found a nice site overlooking the lake, and slept under the stars, with a cool breeze to keep the bugs away.

The next morning we visited the Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument. Walked through the visitors center, watched the informative movie and took a short hike, then got back on the road. We headed into Oklahoma to get those last two counties. On the way to Kiowa County, we were passing right by Quartz Mountain State Park. We couldn’t be this close without stopping. It is a very pretty park, though the lake was very low at the time. We spent about an hour here before heading to our next destination.

Quartz Mountain Nature Park near Altus, OK.

The Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge is a place I had to hear about for a while but had not yet managed to visit. It was getting late and I was thinking we should just head home, but Ren knew how much I have wanted to go here and insisted that we take the time. I’m so glad I listen to her. I had been afraid that after seeing New Mexico, that Oklahoma would seem dull and unimpressive by comparison. I needn’t have worried. The mountains of Oklahoma may not be as tall as those of New Mexico, but they are no less beautiful. We ended up staying much longer than we intended and it was getting dark by the time we headed home.

Arriving home late, we were tired and sore, however, the trip had been more than we ever expected because we abandoned our plans and took a chance. Sometimes having a plan is important because it tells you the when, the where, and the how; but it often causes you to miss the unexpected treasures of traveling along the backroads. Our motto is “Get out, live life outside your box,” which sometimes means getting outside of your plans. Take a chance, do something unexpected, live your life to the fullest. I still want to go back to Black Mesa. I still want those dark skies. But I wouldn’t trade this trip for the one we planned.

Remember to get out and live life outside your box!!!
All images taken by Scott and Ren. ©2021crosscountytravelers
Let’s Go Grab Some Counties

Let’s Go Grab Some Counties

Psychoanalyst Werner Muensterberger states in his book Collecting: An Unruly Passion that collecting was “selecting, gathering and keeping of objects of subjective value.” While Carl Jung believed collecting stemmed from a collective unconscious of “nuts and berry” behavior inherited from our ancestors. This activity of our prehistoric ancestors literally saved their lives and it is now found to be a comfortable behavior to each and every one of us today.

Scott and I are definitely collectors. Over the past few years, we have mentioned things like “collecting counties” and “county grab” in our blog posts and videos. Recently we received a message asking exactly what this is and why we are doing it. Please allow us to take a few minutes and define these terms and explain exactly what our County Project is.


How This Thing Sort of Began

The Texas Capitol, August 17, 2013

Scott and I had started to do a little exploring of towns around us, but there really wasn’t much exploring outside of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex until August 17, 2013. We had decided to head to Austin because Scott is a music nut; his favorite female artist is Nancy Griffith and he had a goal in mind. The plan was to attend Austin City Limits, but it wasn’t supposed to happen because the shows are announced and are a first come type of situation. However, we were able to change our plans and help him come a little closer to his music world.

Scott poses at the Sixth & Congress intersection that was made famous by Nancy Griffith’s song
Love at the Five and Dime

This trip to Austin seemed to spark the travel bug in us and we began to go as often and as far as possible. From 2013 to 2015 we started visiting Texas State Parks and something occurred to us, we have over 100 counties crossed in the State of Texas so we started paying attention to those 254 Texas counties. The County Project was born without us really understanding what the heck we were doing.


So What Exactly Is The County Project?

When Scott and I were first married and moving between Oklahoma and Texas over and over, we were moving hundreds of boxes of things I collected and all of his books and music. It was heavy and exhausting. In 2016 we decided it was time to ditch all of the extra boxes and go from a house to an apartment. This meant getting rid of the collection of books, nicknacks, and other junk we accumulate over time and adopt a more minimalistic outlook. But we still had the desire to collect. That is when the travel and counties began to make total sense to us.

Starting out as Stitchntravel.com we decided to not only start a website but a YouTube channel as well. We had no idea what we were doing, but we thought it would be a great way to show off our travels. This eventually led us to a website where one could keep track of the counties visited. Mob-rule has enabled us to see exactly where we have been and others as well.

This tool has helped us find what we really love to collect, counties. The collecting of counties is nothing more than us driving across county lines to find out interesting things about each county we visit. This may mean just driving through to get to another county but we find roadside attractions that are unique to the county, landscape that is different from other places, and backroads that lead us to amazing adventures.


Actively Collecting Counties

We have a term we made up to explain exactly what a trip was going to be used for when we collect counties; this word is “county grab”. This is where we get in the car and head to counties we have never been to and try to drive through as many as possible. This is often a two-day trip and we will use the special Google imposed map on the Mob-rule site to help us find what roads pass through what counties. Because it keeps track of the counties we have visited, we are able to see just where we need to go.

Once we have made the decision as to where the destination is, we will use the map to find another route to head home. We try very hard to never take the same road home that we came on because it will get us twice the counties. Often times we will do what we can to get a photo of the county courthouses if possible.

We have set up specific colors that have specific meanings to help us know what counties we have just driven through, taken a photo of the county courthouse, what will be the one-way drive to a destination, and what will be the route home. This helps us to know what other things we need to do in counties we have already visited, such as if we need to try to and get a photo of a courthouse or not.

Here you see counties we have driven through (purple), counties we have obtained courthouse photos (yellow), state capitols we have photos of (orange), a drive to an upcoming destination (light green), and the route home (dark green).

We are even able to break this down to a state-level which enables us to do a little more digging as to what we want to see and do.

As we plan our county grabs, we will go to the Google imposed maps for further detail to help us see where the county seat is located. This is important to us so we can know what route to take to get a photo of the courthouses.

Screenshot from Mob-rule site showing the planned counties to travel.

And then we are able to scroll in closer so we can see how to collect a county in one direction and back in another direction. Let us look at this area a little closer so we can explain it in a bit more detail.

Screenshot from Mob-rule site showing the possible county grab so we are not taking the same roads.

Here you have three counties and we would like to get all three without driving the same road home as when we came. This blown-up view enables us to find alternate roads that are on a backroad level if we would like. It has enabled us to really up our county collecting game.


How Do We Keep Track of Our Stats?

Keeping track is very easy to do. The user page on Mob-rule shows a spreadsheet with each state, the numbers of counties, the numbers of counties we have visited, the numbers of counties left to visit, and the percentages. It helps us to find the information quickly and be able to apply it to our website.

This really helps to encourage us and it gives us the oxytocin boost a regular collection would give. With this, the US map, and the courthouse photos we are able to get excited about where we have been and where we are heading to. Isn’t that what life is all about?


What Are The Benefits to Collecting Counties?

Many people travel, but everyone does not travel alike. For some it is flying to places, renting a car, and hitting popular sites. While others enjoy driving long distances to visit the vacation hot spots. However, for us, driving and seeing is the adventure. This style of travel we are doing enables us to take the roads less traveled and see some of the less touristy places. I honestly believe this has caused us to find some of the most amazing places and pieces of art.

We found a road to took us to Uncertain, Texas. We found a whole town full of car art.

Another benefit to the way we travel, we are able to avoid major crowds. With our national park system being more overcrowded than ever before, it is nice to get off the regular beaten path and find interesting places that are not as crowded. This enables us to bring attention to the places that are overlooked. We have met some of the most amazing people in these places and heard some wonderful stories about the location.

Because of us trying to obtain specific counties we have found some pretty fantastic things. If we would not have been trying to get specific counties in Wyoming’s southwestern corner, we would never have found Fossil Butte National Monument and then spontaneously grabbing a Utah county. We try to play it loose when we do county grabs because there are plenty of these spontaneous moments. It enables us to respond to new discoveries.


Our GrandGeorge looking out daydreaming where this road will take her.

Cross County Travelers is about encouraging people to get out of their routine and try something different, to find the amazing lesser-known places all around them but do not get the attention they deserve. This is why we say “Get Out! Live life outside your box.” The box can be your home, your city, or even your county. What we want to encourage is people to get out of their comfort zone and experience something new through travel. Travel does not have to be a big expensive trip, there are adventures to be found right in your “backyard” that will open your mind and heart.

Thank you so much for joining us. We do appreciate each of you who take the time to read our posts. It means so much to us. Please remember to Get Out, Live Life Outside Your Box; you know we are.

Remember to get out and live life outside your box!!!
All images taken by Scott and Ren. ©2021crosscountytravelers
Moving Home For A Good Cause – UPDATE

Moving Home For A Good Cause – UPDATE

The Art Auction Fundraiser went really well. We raised over $2,000 to help us get the items we need to fix up the RV and to get the tags and title.

We want to thank each and everyone who has donated items, purchased the items, and donated to the original fundraiser. Because of you, we have a home and a way to fix what needs to be repaired.

Thank you. We could not have done this without you.

Moving Home For a Good Cause

Moving Home For a Good Cause

In April 2021, Scott had a stroke less than a year after his quintuple bypass. This was because three of the five bypasses failed and the remaining two bypasses becoming 80% blocked. He went from 55% heart function to 25% in less than six months. Because his heart and arteries are so diseased from diabetes he is unable to apply for a heart transplant or have further bypass surgeries.


The doctors painted a very grim outlook for Scott over the next two to five years. They explained the elevation we were living at probably caused this to happen at a much faster rate than it would have at a lower elevation so we needed to move back to Oklahoma. If we stayed in Colorado, they said he would only have one to two years; however, if he was able to move to a lower elevation such as Oklahoma, he could have up to five. We chose to give him more time, so it was time to pack the boxes.

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We packed everything, moved it all into storage, and are now back in Oklahoma staying with family. Having searched for weeks and some help from friends who donated to our original fundraiser, we now have a motorhome to live in. However, it was gutted and there is much to do.

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This is not our photo, this is the former owner’s photo of the motorhome set up. Used with permission.

The former owners gutted the motorhome and made it to fit them. They took out the propane system and the 12-volt electric system. They have it completely on the normal power grid and it was done poorly. Unfortunately, we need to replace the 12-volt and normal electric system, add a propane system, replace the 1940s refrigerator with a three-way fridge, add a heater, add a shower, and a seat to be able to drive it home. There are a few other “minor” things we would love to do such as a better, insulated floor, painting, and just making it ours; but those are cosmetic. As you can see from the above photo, the outside looks really good.

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Family and friends have set up an art auction for us to help us finish the motorhome. There have been many pieces of artwork (painting, embroidery, photography, and more) donated by artist friends who are extremely talented. Please join us July 2-16 (central time) and help us by bidding on some art for yourself.

*** please remember shipping will be extra unless otherwise noted by the artist or it is outside the United States. ***

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If you would prefer to donate to help us get the motorhome in liveable condition, please visit the original fundraiser at https://www.facebook.com/donate/163996742323297/. We were able to purchase the motorhome by the donations already provided, but we are still short of our goal.

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Thank you so much for taking the time to read our blog posts. We appreciate it so very, very much! missyoucordie.png


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I’m Gonna Pass, Thank You!

I’m Gonna Pass, Thank You!

The very first trip Scott and I made after arriving in Colorado Springs was a Pass, Kenosha Pass 10,000 ft (3,000 m) to be exact. We had only experienced a real, Colorado Pass the previous July when we visited. Cucharas Pass is 9,995 feet (approximately 3046 m) and looking back now, it doesn’t seem impressive at all, or was it and we just did not know what we were experiencing? Since we have moved to this state we have found amazing passes that we just love going over!

In the state of Colorado, you will find 166 mountain passes over 7,783 feet (2,372 m). Of those passes, 107 are actually drivable; however, there are only 61 of those are paved while the rest are either gravel or unimproved. Of the 61 roads that are drivable with an ordinary car (meaning low clearance and not a 4×4), 30 of them are over 10,000 ft (3048 m). Stat-wise, this is a very collectible project.

What Exactly Is A Pass?

Vocabulary.com defines a mountain pass as: “the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks.” Simply put they are just places where two mountains come together. I have heard the terms gap, notch, saddle, and pass used to describe the easiest area to get over the mountains. We experienced some in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and even Texas, but they were nowhere near as impressive as the passes we have crossed over in Colorado.

I have watched video after video of people driving over passes like Loveland Pass, Imogene Pass, and Black Bear Pass. What I remember most was that these things were massive and could be rather intimidating. What I am learning though, as we travel more and experience the many different passes here in Colorado, is that passes can be intense, but they can also be nothing more than a slight “hill”; at least they may only feel that way. This has helped me to actually look forward to going over the many passes we have left to collect.

Often the pass has a “plateau” of sorts and buildings and rest areas are sometimes placed there. These are also places where boundaries or borders are found such as the county line between Huerfano and Las Animas. Here you find the Cucharas Pass and just six miles from Cordova Pass that is also a dividing line between the two counties. This is not just a county border thing either, there are countries that have their borders meeting along mountain passes much like Chile and Argentina. The border between them runs along the Andes Mountain range and has many border crossings; over 42 passes.

Are Passes Really THAT Scary?

When we first started talking about collecting counties, we knew there were going to be roads that would intimidate us. For me the roads that were steep and winding caused me to freak out. I remember our first time driving the Talimena Drive between Oklahoma and Arkansas. We had watched many videos to help us figure out how to descend a mountain and it really made me nervous; I wasn’t even pulling a trailer! I was so worried about burning out my breaks that my nerves were shot by the time we arrived on flat roads. The highest elevation we reached that trip was 2,681 feet; this was nothing compared to the many passes here we have driven that are over 10,000 feet since moving to Colorado.

There are many reasons people are worried about passes. Passes can have steep grades, sharp turns, and dangerous drop-offs. Many people who drive on the Colorado roads have never driven on anything but straight flat roads; their inexperience can be dangerous and frustrating. There is something shocking about the yellow signs with a semi-truck pointing downwards or tipping over when you reach the top of a pass. It can be intimidating and worrisome; however, keeping one’s mind on the road and driving over the passes a few times, they are no more scary than any other highway.

Road sign images and explanations found HERE at the US Department of Transportation website.

Why Are Mountain Roads So Steep and Twisty?

While looking up information on mountain passes, a specific question kept showing up, “Why are mountain roads so steep and twisty? Why can’t they just be made to go straight up and over?” I found answers to this question in a couple of places. Let’s look at the first part of the question. “Why are the roads so steep?”

Roads follow the lay of the land. If you are driving in parts of East Colorado, you will basically be driving on flat, straight roads because that is how the land lays. Highway 70 from the Kansas border to Denver is a great example of this. You may have a few rolling hills because it is a prairie, but the land is fairly flat and the road follows this. However, Highway 70 from Denver to Grand Junction goes over mountains and into valleys. The road placement is determined by the slope of the mountains and, therefore, determines the “grade” or rate of climb/descent of the road causing this section of the highway to have steep climbs and many curves.

Open Oregon Educational Resources explained this rather well in their article “Assessing Slope of the Land“. They defined the slope to be the “incline of the land”. The land surveying has a math formula to help them know what the incline will be and then are able to give the appropriate warnings for drivers to use when traveling these areas. It is all extremely technical and if you would like to review the article, please feel free to do so by clicking the article title previously mentioned.

Screenshot taken from Google Maps to show an example of hairpin turns.

The slope and lay of the land also determine why roads have so many curves to them; however, not all curves are created because of this. Often steep roads will have what is called “hairpin” or “switchback” turns to help a driver climb a mountain in a short amount of space. These types of turns are usually steep and have sharp turns. One of the most famous roads in the United States that shows this extreme elevation change in less than half a quarter of a mile is Lombard Street in San Francisco, California. True the elevation change is not as extreme as in the mountains, however, the fact that the distance is so short from top to bottom, the grade is 27%, making this a very interesting drive.

Most roads in Colorado are not close to this extreme. On the passes here, you will mostly find grades of 6-9%, rarely anything more. However, you will occasionally find a few roads with more of an incline, but rarely on the main highways. These switchbacks help vehicles climb to the top of the mountains using less energy and providing safety as well. Between snow, ice, rain, and wind, the weather conditions can cause roads to be dangerous so everything that can be done to help drivers be safe is well worth it.

Safety On The Passes

Could not find our snow plow images so… Image by Pixaline from Pixabay 

Mountain passes can be dangerous, but with the help of the Colorado Department of Transportation (CoDoT) and a few safety precautions, the experience can be rewarding and successful. Before we get into our car, we make sure we have the correct safety equipment for the road depending upon the weather we will experience. This means we have good tires, our snow cables for the tires, and we know what the weather conditions are for the area we are traveling. We will pull up the traffic information for the highways we are planning to drive and make sure we have clear alternative routes if needed. CoDoT has a variety of tools on their website that can assist us on our travel and we use those tools often.

One of the things we love about Colorado is that CoDoT is very good about getting roads cleared as soon as possible. This goes for the normal everyday roads and the passes alike. If winter weather storms have been predicted, they are out as soon as possible to start the de-icing and then they begin to plow as soon as possible. We have found the passes easy and safe to traverse, but we are still careful.

There are a few things that have to happen when driving the passes that are important to do to keep yourself and others safe. One is to know how to drive up and down these roads.

Driving Up The Mountain

  • Always have your vehicle in good working order. Be sure the brakes, windshield wipers, and tires are in good condition. Watch the fluids in your car to make sure the engine does not overheat. Make sure you have the proper equipment you need with you, such as snow chains, extra wipers, air gauge, and extra fluids like oil, washer, and water/coolant.
  • What may seem like a strange thing to do, but during the summer months, you will want to turn off your air conditioner. This will help keep the engine from overheating, plus the temperature on many mountain passes will be much cooler than you expect.
  • If there are two lanes or passing lanes as you are driving up the mountain, make sure to stay in the right lane unless passing; this is law in most states now. It will keep traffic from backing up and prevent road rage in other drivers who will insist on passing you on the right. However, if there are only two lanes of traffic, keep an eye on the number of cars behind you. If you are impeding traffic, find a turn-out and allow the other drivers to pass. This will help keep people from taking unnecessary chances passing you at the wrong times because they are frustrated.
  • Watch out for warning signs like specific wildlife, Avalanche Area, and Fallen Rock. There has been a history of these things happening in these specific areas. If you keep a watchful eye out in these places, you will probably be able to avoid many of these dangers. However, this is not always the case. If you end up hitting an animal or rocks, remember to not panic, pull over as safely as you can, and make yourself as visible as possible. This will enable people to avoid hitting you. Also, remember to call 9-1-1 so an officer can help you by blocking traffic and assist you with any towing needs you may have.
  • If an avalanche is blocking the road, stop, turn around, and proceed to a safe area because there may be more avalanches occurring; DO NOT attempt to drive through one. There is a movement happening you may not see and it could take you down the mountain with it. If you are caught up in an avalanche, DO NOT PANIC. Make sure you have your seatbelt on, turn off the engine so the inside does not fill with carbon monoxide, call 9-1-1, and stay in your car.
  • SLOW DOWN! Do not try to race to the top of the mountain, it will still be there no matter how slow you take it. Too often people are in a hurry to get where they are going and they make mistakes. This in itself could cause an accident or worse if you take a turn too quickly.

Arriving on the Pass

  • Once you have reached the top of the pass, there are often places to park, trailheads, or scenic overlooks. Take advantage of those areas to get out of your vehicle. You probably need to walk around or stretch. If there are not any of these, prepare to drive down the pass.

Driving Down The Mountain

  • If you are in a vehicle with a diesel engine, then you will use the engine brakes to slow you down. You will only need to “tap” your breaks if you accelerate faster than you need to be traveling.
  • If you have an automatic engine, there is a “manual” setting or an L1, L2, L3. You will need to use these if the grade is large. Then you will only need to “tap” your breaks occasionally to slow you down.
  • Do NOT “ride” your breaks. The goal is to proceed down the pass without burning your breaks. Once the breaks get hot, they will not stop. As you accelerate, gently apply your breaks for short periods, being in the lower gears will help the engine slow your vehicle down giving you better control and less need for the breaks.
  • It is suggested a driver not go any faster down the pass than what they were doing up the pass. If you are going slower than other people, stay to the right. Not only is it curtious, it is law in many states.

Why Are There Ski Jumps Next To The Highway?

As we drove down Monarch Pass, we saw what looked like a ski jump at the side of the road. These are special safety ramps to help trucks, and other vehicles, who have lost their brakes due to them getting too hot. These runaway truck ramps have saved lives, but what exactly are they?

This specific truck ramp we saw on highway 50 on the west side of the Monarch Pass is designed to slow the truck by going up the ramp. If it does not slow it down by gravity, there are many lines of barrels filled with gravel and sand to bring it to a halt. This is just one of many types of runaway ramps. Some are a lot longer and some have the “road” filled with gravel to help the wheels of the truck come to a stop. They all do the same thing, stop a runaway truck that has lost its brakes.

In this video, we see a report from Channel 9 News out of Denver about a truck that used the ramp. The driver’s brakes failed and the ramp was there just in time to help save lives. You are able to see the smoke coming from the truck and then he masterfully entered the ramp and was able to stop. These are great safety opportunities for truckers. You can read more on Runaway Truck Ramps by clicking HERE.

Please remember, if you are not experiencing failed breaks, do not use these places as an opportunity to stop. These are extremely important for truckers to use; if a truck becomes runaway and the ramp is not available, lives can and probably will be lost.

How Many Passes In Colorado Have We Collected?

Out of the 79 Colorado mountain passes and highway summits that can be driven because of improved roads we have crossed 30 of them. We go over Ute Pass (9,165 feet – 2,793 m) in Divide many times because we tend to drive Colorado highway 24 often to get to Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. While the highest pass we have crossed is through the Eisenhower Tunnel (11,158 feet – 3,401 m) on Colorado Highway 70.

Permssion to use this photo by Ira Carpenter (son of Uncle Bruce).

One of the most special passes for me in this state is Wolf Creek Pass. One of my favorite uncles was my dad’s brother Uncle Bruce. He was a wall of a man who stayed with us when I was little and my three children loved him as well, especially when he would ask them if they wanted donuts and then thump them on the arm saying, “Hurts Donut!” Sure wish he could have experienced the Hurts Donuts shops around the country. This man was a Vietnam Veteran who received two Purple Hearts, the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, and the Cross of Gallantry. My uncle worked for the Colorado Department of Transportation as one of the snowplow drivers for Wolf Creek Pass, and he was a hero there as well. He saved a woman and her family from a snowbank and was given a commendation from the state of Colorado.

The Passes We Have Crossed

Pass[1]Maximum elevation[2]Maximum grade[3]Road surface[4]Route[5]Coordinates[6]
Bigelow Divide9,403 feet
2,866 m
Asphalt38°05′55″N 105°07′40″W
Cameron Pass10,276 feet
3,132 m
3.8% EB
3.1% WB
Asphalt40°31′15″N 105°53′33″W
Cerro Summit7,958 feet
2,426 m
Asphalt38°26′38″N 107°38′29″W
Coal Bank Pass10,640 feet
3,243 m
6.5% NBAsphalt37°42′02″N 107°46′37″W
Cochetopa Pass[b]10,022 feet
3,055 m
6.00%Gravelformer SH 11438°09′46″N 106°36′00″W
Cucharas Pass9,941 feet
3,030 m
[7]
5.9% NB
5.4% SB
Asphalt37°19′13″N 105°04′25″W
Cumbres Pass10,022 feet
3,055 m
6.30%Asphalt37°01′14″N 106°27′00″W
Dunckley Pass9,763 feet
2,976 m
[7]
Gravelformer SH 13240°12′06″N 107°09′31″W
Eisenhower Tunnel[e]11,158 feet
3,401 m
7.0% EB
6.0% WB
Concrete39°40′44″N 105°55′29″W
Golden Gate Pass7,754 feet
2,363 m
[7]
Asphalt39°48′57″N 105°23′49″W
Gunsight Pass8,332 feet
2,540 m
[7]
Gravelformer SH 28940°12′33″N 106°19′54″W
Hardscrabble Pass9,085 feet
2,769 m
Asphalt38°09′32″N 105°17′58″W
Kenosha Pass10,001 feet
3,048 m
5.3% EBAsphalt39°24′46″N 105°45′27″W
Lizard Head Pass10,222 feet
3,116 m
4.10%Asphalt37°48′40″N 107°54′22″W
Marshall Pass[b]10,842 feet
3,305 m
Gravelcontinentil divide38°23′29″N 106°14′50″W
Milner Pass[a][b]10,759 feet
3,279 m
5.4% WBAsphalt40°25′11″N 105°48′41″W
Molas Pass10,910 feet
3,325 m
7.00%Asphalt37°44′16″N 107°41′53″W
Monument Hill7,352 feet
2,241 m
Asphalt39°07′26″N 104°51′51″W
North La Veta Pass9,413 feet
2,869 m
6.00%Asphalt37°36′48″N 105°11′27″W
North Pass[b]10,149 feet
3,093 m
6.00%Asphalt38°12′51″N 106°34′21″W
Palmer Saddle7,230 feet
2,204 m
Asphalt39°07′22″N 104°54′46″W
Pass Creek Pass9,400 feet
2,865 m
Gravelformer SH 30537°37′14″N 105°13′46″W
Poncha Pass9,010 feet
2,746 m
2.90%Asphalt38°25′20″N 106°05′13″W
Promontory Divide8,579 feet
2,615 m
[7]
Asphalt37°56′16″N 105°19′37″W
Raton Pass[h]7,834 feet
2,388 m
[h]
Asphalt36°59′26″N 104°28′54″W
Tennessee Pass[b]10,424 feet
3,177 m
6.00%Asphalt39°21′44″N 106°18′38″W
Ute Pass9,165 feet
2,793 m
5.60%Asphalt38°56′30″N 105°09′27″W
Wilkerson Pass9,507 feet
2,898 m
5.80%Asphalt39°02′17″N 105°31′32″W
Wolf Creek Pass[b]10,857 feet
3,309 m
6.80%Asphalt37°28′59″N 106°48′07″W
Wondervu Hill8,660 feet
2,640 m
Asphalt39°55′28″N 105°23′48″W

And Like All Passes, We Must Move On To The Next One

Passes are amazing structures of engineering. They take planning, math, and a lot of work hours. There are many people who work hard to provide safe passage over these elevated passes and we thank them for their hard work. I know I enjoy experiencing each of these passes and I can’t wait to cross over as many as possible while we explore the state of Colorado.

Thank you so much for joining us. We do appreciate each of you who take the time to read our posts. It means so much to us. Please remember to Get Out, Live Life Outside Your Box; you know we are.

All images taken by Scott and Ren. ©2021crosscountytravelers