Scott’s Friday Photo – Sequoyah Park, Tahlequah Oklahoma

Scott’s Friday Photo – Sequoyah Park, Tahlequah Oklahoma

On our way to Arkansas to enjoy the fall colors, Ren and I stopped at a small city park, Sequoyah Park, to stretch our legs and take the dog for a short walk. This is a pretty little park near downtown, and the trees were in fine color, so naturally, I took some photos. It was on a Friday morning so we pretty much had the park to ourselves. I thought the contrast between the trees, the grass, and the clouds made for some interesting compositions.


Scott looking to make sure his shot was perfect; taken by Ren.

We were afraid we had missed the peak of fall colors, but, here in the Cherokee capital, it seems we might have chosen the perfect weekend to do our seasonal color trip. This park runs right along the Tahlequah Creek which runs into the Illinois River just east of the town. There are two historic WPA bridges crossing the small creek which gave it a great composition.

Ren often looks for the shots with her phone’s camera so I can see what she’s talking about. This is one of those shots.

One of our favorite places in Oklahoma and Arkansas is the Talimena National Scenic Byway. We have taken it many times, but this year we decided to just do the mountain range this amazing drive between Talihina, Oklahoma, and Mena, Arkansas. The Ouachita National Forest was where we found ourselves searching out many waterfalls.


Little Missouri Falls on the Little Missouri River in Ouachita National Forest taken by Ren.

Our total mileage was 557 miles to find some amazing colors and waterfalls. Most of the mileage came because we had driven so much within the National Forest, but the trip one way was approximately 215 miles to get into the forest. All in all, you don’t always need to travel to distant or exotic locations to get a good photo. Sometimes you just need to look around you and imagine the possibilities


One of my finished photos of the park.
Safe Travels
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Scott’s Friday Photo – Keystone Dam Oklahoma

Scott’s Friday Photo – Keystone Dam Oklahoma

Most of my photos come on our travels, but we can’t travel every weekend. For various reasons, we have been staying closer to home recently. When we can’t travel I try to find good subjects for photography in my local area.
Keystone Lake is just a few miles upstream from Tulsa on the Arkansas River. With Oklahoma subject to periodic droughts, the Keystone Dam is often not very impressive, with just enough water flowing to generate power, but Oklahoma has been pretty wet this year, and there have been very heavy rains upstream, so they are running a lot of water through the dam right now.

We got up early to try and get a photo of the Moon setting over the dam, I had the location planned correctly, but I messed up on the timing. The Moon was setting just as we drove up, and I could not get the camera set up in time to get the shot. Still, we had some interesting light, and there was a strong mist from the dam that developed into a heavy fog. We stayed for a few hours and I took pictures in the changing light. Ren is very understanding and patient with my early morning photo jaunts.

The area below the dam was filled with birds, thousands of them. The Pelicans were passing through on their annual migration. As the sun was rising they began to feed.

As we were leaving we found that most of the flock were on the lake side of the dam. It was hard to tell in the fog but the lake was covered in Pelicans for as far as we could see. This photo only captures a tiny portion of them.

While I did not get the photo I was after, I am still pleased with the photos that I did get.

 

Safe Travels
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Scott’s Friday Photo – Rio Grande Gorge Bridge

Scott’s Friday Photo – Rio Grande Gorge Bridge

Located on Highway 64 ten miles northwest of Taos, New Mexico, the Gorge Bridge is 1280 feet long and spans the Rio Grande River and is one of the highest bridges in the country. Sources disagree over just exactly how high the bridge is above the river, with some saying 600 feet and others saying 650 feet. The gorge is particularly deep in this area because the river flows through a continental rift zone. This is an area when the continental plate tried to tear it’s self apart millions of years ago, then stopped before the separation was complete.
It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is both a National Monument and a State Park. The bridge is something of a tourist attraction with parking available along with restrooms and an observation deck. The bridge has a pedestrian shoulder so you can walk across it if you like.
Ren and I visited in August. We had not heard of the bridge, but the manager of our hotel told us we should go see it while we were in the area. I’m so glad we listened. This was my favorite part of the entire trip. If you are in the area it is well worth seeing, and if the Bus Stop Ice Cream and Coffee Stop are there, you should absolutely treat yourself. Ren loved the frozen coffee.
These photos were taken with my Sony A6000 using the SEL1850 lens. The panorama above was stitched together from 3 photos.

 


*Looking South From The Bridge *
Safe Travels
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